CENTER NEWS

EVENTS, STORIES & ANNOUNCEMENTS

STORY May 19, 2017 | 2:12 PM

Judge Sergio A. Gutierrez

Oneonta Greenhouse Complex Educates Students and Saves Energy

Published: March 11, 2011 | 8:55 AM

A greenhouse complex at the Oneonta Job Corps Academy is making the campus more sustainable and will soon contribute to the well-being of the surrounding community.

Solar energy is collected to provide hot water to the greenhouse, and photovoltaic panels generate electrical power by converting solar radiation into direct-current electricity. The system generates enough electricity to power the entire complex.

Students built a walkway surrounding the greenhouse using pervious concrete, which allows storm water to seep through the concrete into the ground and be recharged as groundwater. A gravity-fed pond uses natural water runoff and solar pumps to circulate water to the greenhouse irrigation system.

Sustainability is one of the first concepts students learn about on center. New students entering Oneonta are educated about the greenhouse complex during their first week on campus. The Green Thumb Club, made up of staff members and students with horticultural interests, maintains the greenhouse.

Club members ensure the greenhouse benefits the center and the community. The Club aims to have plants growing in the greenhouse year-round, with a large crop of fruits and vegetables grown during the summer months. As the complex becomes more productive, the Club will look to partner with and provide produce to organizations such as Meals on Wheels, local farmers' markets, and other community-based organizations.

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Oneonta Job Corps Students, Staff, Supporters Celebrate 2nd Annual National Job Corps Commencement Day

Published: August 31, 2012 | 4:11 PM

Oneonta Job Corps Center joined all Job Corps centers across the country to celebrate the second annual National Job Corps Commencement Day on August 24, 2012, and to congratulate the Job Corps students who showed that "Job Corps Works" by completing the program this year.

Recent Job Corps graduates, employer partners, local policymakers, community leaders, family members, and many others recognized these students' achievements and the investment they made in their futures and our community.

"There are only two things that matter: discipline and love," said Congressman Christopher Gibson - District 20, the keynote speaker at Oneonta Job Corps Center's commencement ceremony. "You were here getting the discipline; just remember the love."

Local community members that have worked with Job Corps volunteers also joined the celebration to congratulate many of their student volunteers. Job Corps students and staff work with local community-based organizations and non-profits, logging many hours of volunteer service every year. For example, Oneonta Job Corps students work with Opportunities for Otsego to provide needed services to the county.

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Oneonta Job Corps Students, Staff, Supporters Celebrate 2nd Annual National Job Corps Commencement Day

Published: September 01, 2012 | 2:45 PM

Oneonta Job Corps Center joined all Job Corps centers across the country to celebrate the second annual National Job Corps Commencement Day on August 24, 2012, and to congratulate the Job Corps students who showed that "Job Corps Works" by completing the program this year.

Recent Job Corps graduates, employer partners, local policymakers, community leaders, family members, and many others recognized these students' achievements and the investment they made in their futures and our community.

"There are only two things that matter: discipline and love," said Congressman Christopher Gibson - District 20, the keynote speaker at Oneonta Job Corps Center's commencement ceremony. "You were here getting the discipline; just remember the love."

Local community members that have worked with Job Corps volunteers also joined the celebration to congratulate many of their student volunteers. Job Corps students and staff work with local community-based organizations and non-profits, logging many hours of volunteer service every year. For example, Oneonta Job Corps students work with Opportunities for Otsego to provide needed services to the county.

Read More

Judge Sergio A. Gutierrez

Published: May 19, 2017 | 2:12 PMSTORIES

Job Corps' motto is "Success Lasts a Lifetime" and nowhere is this more evident than in the story of Idaho Court of Appeals Chief Judge Sergio Gutierrez, who received his GED and studied carpentry at the Wolf Creek Job Corps Center in the early 1970s.

Born in Chihuahua, Mexico, Sergio crossed the border with his family and settled in Stockton, California. His father struggled to make ends meet for his six children on field workers’ wages and his mother suffered from crippling mental illness. To ease their burden, Sergio, then four years old, and one of his sisters moved to Carlsbad, New Mexico, to live with their loving grandmother in a leaky, hole-covered house that he remembers as barely habitable. Despite this poverty and hardship, Sergio was inspired by his grandmother’s wisdom and promised her that he would make something of himself.

When Gutierrez was 12, his beloved grandmother died, and he moved back to Stockton with his mother, his farm worker stepfather, and 12 other siblings. Scraping by in these conditions proved to be too much for the young man. He dropped out of high school after finishing 9th grade and fell in with a crowd of older boys that he admits were hoodlums.

Often homeless and frustrated with barely getting by on menial jobs, Sergio went to an employment office where he met a woman who recommended the Job Corps program to him. Resolving to fulfill his promise to his grandmother, he enrolled that day. This was when his new life began.

At 16, Sergio began attending the Wolf Creek Job Corps Center in Oregon. The structure, support, and serenity of the center "gave me an affirmation that I could do something with my life." Sergio quickly became a leader among the students and graduated with carpentry skills and a GED.

Transformed by his experiences at Wolf Creek, Sergio went on to earn both an undergraduate and a law degree, practiced law, and was appointed to the Idaho Court of Appeals in 2002.

Judge Gutierrez attributes his success to the Job Corps program. "I was not going down the right path, and the program literally saved my life," he said. “My life turned around when I enrolled in the Wolf Creek Job Corp Center in Glide, Oregon. Job Corps saved my life. I have a Bachelor of Arts degree from Boise State University and a Juris Doctor from the University of California, Hastings Law School. But I am most proud of the GED that I attained at Wolf Creek because it represented a new start in my life.”

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Monique Williams Jordan

Published: May 19, 2017 | 2:11 PMSTORIES

With a pinch of passion, a sprinkle of creativity and a generous amount of determination, "Chef Moe," Monique Williams, has turned her culinary aspirations into a recipe for success.

Her journey began as a culinary arts student at Woodstock Job Corps Center in Maryland - the same school where she landed her first job. After several years of teaching and inspiring other young chefs, Williams became the first former Job Corps student to become an advanced instructor at Anne Arundel Community College’s hands-on culinary program.

Chef Moe was recognized during the 45th Anniversary of Job Corps celebration and later joined her Woodland Job Corps Center culinary students to cook with Chef Robert Irvine from the Food Network show Dinner: Impossible. "The opportunity to make a life-changing difference in the lives of other young people is very special to me, and I will forever be grateful to Job Corps for giving me that," said Williams.

Chef Moe’s work in the kitchen is truly inspired, but it’s her gift for inspiring others to achieve independence and success, no matter where they come from, that has the power to change the world. We can’t wait to see what she cooks up next.

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Troy Carter

Published: May 19, 2017 | 2:09 PMSTORIES

Like many Job Corps graduates, Troy Carter began his life in a low-income neighborhood with nothing but a dream of music industry success and a drive to make it happen. After struggling to balance his education with a budding music career, Carter enrolled in the former Chesapeake Job Corps Center in Port Deposit, Maryland in 1990.

Carter quickly graduated from Job Corps with a GED. Saying the program "helped me experience independence for the first time,” Carter applied his new skills and perspective with renewed focus to his music industry ambitions.

Today he is the CEO of Coalition Media Group, a successful Beverly Hills, California, artist management and digital marketing company. He has worked closely with superstars like Sean "Diddy" Combs, DJ Jazzy Jeff, Will Smith, Eve, Nelly, and Lady Gaga.

Carter says America needs institutions like Job Corps because building leaders "starts in school" with students who "don’t stop dreaming and work hard.” He is living proof that, if just given the opportunity, tomorrow’s leader could be anyone, even an ambitious young dreamer from West Philadelphia.

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Jania Barnett, Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA)

Published: March 15, 2013 | 2:47 PM

Oneonta Job Corps was a beacon of hope to a young lady who realized that to have a career she needed more than her high school diploma. Jania Barnett enrolled in Job Corps at the age of 21 in order to achieve her goal of becoming trained to work in the medical field.

Jania entered the Health Occupations Technology (HOT) program after a short time in academic classes where she worked to improve her Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE) scores in order to be able to do well in her trade. Janie struggled with some of the course work in her trade, but she dug deep and worked harder in order to improve her grades. Jania completed the HOT program with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first aid certifications but failed her CNA state exam on her first try. Jania did not accept defeat. While enrolled back in full-time academics to improve her TABE scores and await the next CNA state exam, she searched for a leisure time employment position that would allow her to keep her CNA skills sharp.

Jania was hired at ARC Otsego where she worked second shift at a residential facility assisting residents with daily living activities. When Jania took her CNA exam the second time, she passed. Jania chose to relocate to Oneonta, New York, and keep her position at ARC Otsego instead of going home to Binghamton, New York. Jania graduated from Oneonta Job Corps in November 2012 and continues to be a full-time employee at ARC Otsego using her CNA skills.

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Judge Sergio A. Gutierrez

Published: May 19, 2017 | 2:12 PMSTORIES

Job Corps' motto is "Success Lasts a Lifetime" and nowhere is this more evident than in the story of Idaho Court of Appeals Chief Judge Sergio Gutierrez, who received his GED and studied carpentry at the Wolf Creek Job Corps Center in the early 1970s.

Born in Chihuahua, Mexico, Sergio crossed the border with his family and settled in Stockton, California. His father struggled to make ends meet for his six children on field workers’ wages and his mother suffered from crippling mental illness. To ease their burden, Sergio, then four years old, and one of his sisters moved to Carlsbad, New Mexico, to live with their loving grandmother in a leaky, hole-covered house that he remembers as barely habitable. Despite this poverty and hardship, Sergio was inspired by his grandmother’s wisdom and promised her that he would make something of himself.

When Gutierrez was 12, his beloved grandmother died, and he moved back to Stockton with his mother, his farm worker stepfather, and 12 other siblings. Scraping by in these conditions proved to be too much for the young man. He dropped out of high school after finishing 9th grade and fell in with a crowd of older boys that he admits were hoodlums.

Often homeless and frustrated with barely getting by on menial jobs, Sergio went to an employment office where he met a woman who recommended the Job Corps program to him. Resolving to fulfill his promise to his grandmother, he enrolled that day. This was when his new life began.

At 16, Sergio began attending the Wolf Creek Job Corps Center in Oregon. The structure, support, and serenity of the center "gave me an affirmation that I could do something with my life." Sergio quickly became a leader among the students and graduated with carpentry skills and a GED.

Transformed by his experiences at Wolf Creek, Sergio went on to earn both an undergraduate and a law degree, practiced law, and was appointed to the Idaho Court of Appeals in 2002.

Judge Gutierrez attributes his success to the Job Corps program. "I was not going down the right path, and the program literally saved my life," he said. “My life turned around when I enrolled in the Wolf Creek Job Corp Center in Glide, Oregon. Job Corps saved my life. I have a Bachelor of Arts degree from Boise State University and a Juris Doctor from the University of California, Hastings Law School. But I am most proud of the GED that I attained at Wolf Creek because it represented a new start in my life.”

Read More

Troy Carter

Published: May 19, 2017 | 2:09 PMSTORIES

Like many Job Corps graduates, Troy Carter began his life in a low-income neighborhood with nothing but a dream of music industry success and a drive to make it happen. After struggling to balance his education with a budding music career, Carter enrolled in the former Chesapeake Job Corps Center in Port Deposit, Maryland in 1990.

Carter quickly graduated from Job Corps with a GED. Saying the program "helped me experience independence for the first time,” Carter applied his new skills and perspective with renewed focus to his music industry ambitions.

Today he is the CEO of Coalition Media Group, a successful Beverly Hills, California, artist management and digital marketing company. He has worked closely with superstars like Sean "Diddy" Combs, DJ Jazzy Jeff, Will Smith, Eve, Nelly, and Lady Gaga.

Carter says America needs institutions like Job Corps because building leaders "starts in school" with students who "don’t stop dreaming and work hard.” He is living proof that, if just given the opportunity, tomorrow’s leader could be anyone, even an ambitious young dreamer from West Philadelphia.

Read More

Monique Williams Jordan

Published: May 19, 2017 | 2:11 PMSTORIES

With a pinch of passion, a sprinkle of creativity and a generous amount of determination, "Chef Moe," Monique Williams, has turned her culinary aspirations into a recipe for success.

Her journey began as a culinary arts student at Woodstock Job Corps Center in Maryland - the same school where she landed her first job. After several years of teaching and inspiring other young chefs, Williams became the first former Job Corps student to become an advanced instructor at Anne Arundel Community College’s hands-on culinary program.

Chef Moe was recognized during the 45th Anniversary of Job Corps celebration and later joined her Woodland Job Corps Center culinary students to cook with Chef Robert Irvine from the Food Network show Dinner: Impossible. "The opportunity to make a life-changing difference in the lives of other young people is very special to me, and I will forever be grateful to Job Corps for giving me that," said Williams.

Chef Moe’s work in the kitchen is truly inspired, but it’s her gift for inspiring others to achieve independence and success, no matter where they come from, that has the power to change the world. We can’t wait to see what she cooks up next.

Read More